Operating Systems

In the August/September 2014 issue of Enterprise Tech Journal, we provided an introduction to one of the most important components of z/OS—the System Management Facilities (SMF) component. Two of the key parts of MVS that write records to SMF are the job scheduling system and the master scheduler. SMF records are written as address spaces are created, executed and terminated. In this article, we’ll describe the life of an address space and when user exits are called and SMF records are written. Future articles will include more detail on SMF parameters, recommendations on SMF file creation and usage, and details about the most important record types…

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I started working on the mainframe less than two years ago and immediately recognized that System z offered a technically superior platform for deploying Linux when compared with many distributed systems. Nearly two years later the deployment level of Linux on the mainframe has remained largely static; certainly we have not seen the growth that you’d expect of a technology that underpins a high-growth space such as the cloud…

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z/OS provides more measurement data than any other operating system, which is one of the great strengths of this platform over others. These measurements allow you to tune the system, debug problems, chargeback for resources, provide management reports to show resource usage and help a capacity planner adequately forecast the future needs. The majority of this wonderful information is written to a data repository by the System Management Facilities (SMF) component. This component is used as a common receptacle of data from other components of z/OS, such as CICS and DB2…

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Last year, I wrote a column for Enterprise Executive that introduced software-defined networking (SDN) to readers. SDN is a relatively new approach to computer networking, which evolved from some preliminary research and work done at UC Berkeley and Stanford University in 2005. SDN proposes to disaggregate traditionally vertically integrated networking stacks to improve network feature velocity and customize network operation for specialized environments. At the same time, this disaggregation will improve network flexibility and manageability. SDN enables “mass customization” of network operations to better support differentiated cloud services. SDN is comprised of a group of technologies that open the data, control and management planes of the network to participate more easily in broader orchestration frameworks through application programming interfaces (APIs). …

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Sometimes a little reverse psychology is necessary to effect a positive outcome. In this case, we show you the best ways to tune your applications by showing you how not to tune them. Consider it a worst practices list. If you don’t care about wasting money on poorly tuned applications, or you’re running your z/OS system for charity, you needn’t bother reading any further.  …

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Starting with z/VSE 4.3, IBM has developed an application framework that lets you monitor your z/VSE systems using standard monitoring interfaces. This application framework is based
on the common standards TCP/IP and the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). It includes an open interface that lets you use your own programs to collect other data…

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On April 28, 2014, IBM once again delivered on its Power roadmap with the announcement of the first of the new POWER8 servers. Altogether, five new models were announced: three that run AIX, Linux and iOS and two that are Linux-only. With POWER, IBM offers a technology that can run multiple operating systems on the same hardware simultaneously. This lets users choose operating systems depending on the application while still using the same server. Additionally, within the Linux-only line of servers, users can now choose between using the traditional PowerVM for virtualization on POWER or they can use POWERKVM, the POWER implementation of Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) for Linux. This lets users utilize the virtualization technology on Linux-only boxes they’re most familiar with. Additionally, IBM, through the OpenPOWER Foundation, released detailed technical specifications for its POWER8 processor, making it one of the rare operating systems that’s open…

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