IT Management

Despite no new hardware or software announcements from IBM, the August 2014 SHARE conference in Pittsburgh was considered a big success. The good news is that SHARE is getting younger. More than 25 percent of conference attendees were first timers; a welcome addition to an aging mainframe workforce…

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It has been said that history repeats itself. George Santayana said: “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” If you live long enough and pay any attention to your surroundings, you notice that over time patterns emerge. Things start to look familiar. What’s passé can suddenly be en vogue again. We see it in the cyclical nature of the financial markets and on the world’s political stage. Even some of today’s fashions echo what was worn in the 1980s…

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Continuous Delivery strategy (see Glossary) takes its origin in start-up companies. The benefits of adopting Continuous Delivery principles are clear and plentiful. Continuous Delivery improvements in productivity are achieved through increased software deployment frequency and delivering new features to production in small increments, thus reducing the risks of production failures. The way Continuous Delivery is adopted in start-ups is organic and straightforward due to the greenfield nature of the development processes and the focus on a specific product or service. Enterprises, however, are a different story (see Figure 1). Enterprises, which often emerge as a result of numerous mergers and acquisitions, have decades-long lifespans, established cultures, policies and processes, and utilize diverse sets of software and hardware. There are concerns about how quickly enterprises can adopt new software development philosophies and strategies [Ref. 3]. Clearly, enterprises would get tangible benefits from adopting a Continuous Delivery strategy as start-up companies do. It is just that the path to adopting disciplines such as Continuous Delivery in enterprise organizations is likely to be different, transformational…

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In the February 2008 issue of zJournal, I wrote an article titled “FICON and Quality of Service (QoS): Making the Case for True, End-to-End, Host-Managed QoS.” That article laid the groundwork for a great deal of discussion in the industry, and with IBM. Given some of the things that we will see in the near future (much sooner than six years), I thought it would be a good idea to revisit the original article, and provide some updates on things that have happened since that article was published six years ago. A subsequent article in Enterprise Tech Journal will examine the technical details of any new functionality at the appropriate time…

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If you regularly read tech news you’ve likely seen a host of complimentary articles, blog posts and retrospectives surrounding the 50th anniversary of the IBM mainframe. The positive recognition is well deserved—and long overdue. As the primary computing platform for financial institutions, insurance companies, government agencies and telecoms, mainframes help power our global economy. This fact alone should hush any lingering predictions about the mainframe’s demise once and for all—if it weren’t for one troublesome trend: the retiring mainframe workforce…

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We’ve heard it so many times before, but there’s a reason the shortage of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) workers in the U .S. is a constant topic of conversation in the IT industry. The shortage is persisting— but it’s not like the work is lifting. Corporations have a drive to innovate like never before, to bring products and services to market more quickly and to gather vast amounts of customer data to understand their customers’ buying behavior. This means the demand for talent, and especially for highly specialized skills, is on the rise…

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What is Enterprise Systems Automation? An application that automates a system activity can be considered a component of Enterprise Systems Automation (ESA). This includes: workload automation, automated operations, system performance monitors, application health checks, network performance monitors, change management, data governance and automated software deployment (DevOps). The common thread running through ESA products is the need to monitor the platform (operating system and hardware), automate a resolution when a problem is detected and generate alerts for problem notification and resolution tools…

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