DB2 & IMS

What are the key priorities for more than 1,700 global mainframe users? Most, as might be expected, are wrestling with increasing demands for processing capacity while simultaneously trying to reduce overall IT costs. BMC Software’s Fifth Annual Worldwide Survey of Mainframe Users shows that mainframes continue to be an essential element of respondents’ data centers as the trusted platform for critical business transaction processing. However, mainframes are increasingly surrounded by and integrated with a variety of UNIX, Linux, and Windows-based systems, delivering key elements of complex, multi-tiered applications. These trends challenge the mainframe operations teams to continue to deliver outstanding performance and availability while meeting the cost objectives the business demands…

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Do you hear that silence? It’s how your data sounds as it slips out the door. More companies are facing the unpleasant task of reporting the loss of their data to the government and their customers. Although many recent instances of data loss were attributed to hackers—with carelessness a close second—insider theft accounts for a good percentage of data losses. Though embarrassing, loss of customer information isn’t as devastating as the loss of the data that drives your company—data that makes your company successful and identifies who you are, including trade secrets, sales and profit forecasts, financial statements, and employee information…

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The access paths formulated by the DB2 optimizer during the BIND and REBIND processes are critical to your application performance. These access paths determine not only how DB2 data is accessed by your program, but how efficiently it’s accessed. Whether you’re preparing a new program, implementing changes into your existing DB2 applications, upgrading to a new version of DB2, or simply trying to achieve optimum performance for existing applications, an exhaustive and thorough REBIND management policy should be of paramount importance…

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Skip-Level Migration

For only the second time in DB2’s short, 27-year history, skip-level migration will once again be a DB2 upgrade option. DB2 10 will allow either the traditional upgrade path from DB2 9 NFM or skip-level migration from DB2 V8 NFM. Most customers have a good handle on what it takes to successfully upgrade one release, but many may not understand the differences and trade-offs involved with a skip-level migration. For example, there could be new DB2 10 functionality that will satisfy or enhance an important business process or possibly you’re just arriving on DB2 V8 and see DB2 10 skip-level migration as a way to realize the benefits of DB2 10 in a slightly shorter time. However, that means features introduced in DB2 9, especially those not available until DB2 9 NFM, won’t be available until migration to DB2 10 is complete. This could be a longer period of time before taking advantage of some significant DB2 9 features than if you had migrated directly to DB2 9. …

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When DB2 10 for z/OS arrives, it will usher in a host of enhancements to both the DB2 catalog and directory. This article addresses how to prepare for migration and details of all the new or improved enhancements. Note that since IBM hasn’t yet announced the Generally Available (GA) date for DB2 10, some things covered here could change, and the timing of this article means it can’t cover every possible new feature or change…

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Traditional mainframe roles are undergoing a metamorphosis that transforms the emphasis from product-centric specialists to a multi-role generalist. With budget cutting and the mandate to “do more with less,” this transformation extends to Database Administrators (DBAs) tasked with multiple responsibilities. Often, DBAs must shift from generalist to specialist and back, and always in an increasingly dynamic, complex environment…

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As businesses try to do more with less and maximize their return on hardware and software investments, optimizing mainframe infrastructure is key. It can offer immediate benefits in performance and revenue, especially to those facing increasing transaction volumes and tight batch-processing windows. Maximizing the Millions of Instructions Per Second (MIPS) a mainframe processes can annually save companies millions of dollars. In situations where mission-critical applications process hundreds of thousands of transactions per hour, maximizing MIPS is imperative…

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