DB2 & IMS

Most application performance problems involve searching and scrolling. Once you find what you’re looking for, you generally can process it quickly. However, with increased use of automated interfaces, frameworks, and generic coding techniques and tools, this problem seems magnified. While changing programming techniques and customizing code is time-consuming, it’s necessary if you want to save processing time and costs over the life of an application. Besides, you typically apply custom solutions as the exception, not the rule, when building an application…

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If you’re planning an upgrade to DB2 10 for z/OS, you’ll want to be aware of the changes to DB2’s subsystem initialization parameters, better known as DSNZPARM members. The keywords on this set of macros control many aspects of DB2’s behavior. This article reviews DSNZPARM changes in DB2 10. DSNZPARMs should be reviewed as part of your upgrade plan to avoid any surprises with DB2’s behavior…

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Preparing for IMS 24x7 Availability

Globalization has presented many challenges to the IT community, not least of which is providing continuous system availability. Where once an East Coast-based information center only needed to adjust for a West Coast transactional processing window, it now must deal with transactional windows half way around the world. Still, viable legacy systems were rarely designed for this, yet accommodations must be made, since many of those systems aren’t easy to replace…

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DB2 for z/OS and REBIND

A key feature of DB2 10 for z/OS yields “out-of-the-box," DB2 CPU savings of up to 10 percent for traditional workloads when compared to running the same workloads on DB2 9. That’s attention-getting, and possible without a REBIND. But to obtain the best performance and memory improvements, it will be necessary to REBIND all PACKAGEs containing static SQL—an idea that can bring fear and angst to many DBAs…

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So, You Thought You Knew QMF?

IBM’s DB2 Query Management Facility (QMF) has been a stable, perpetually reliable workhorse for DB2 query and reporting for many years. However, as other Business Intelligence (BI) technologies evolved, QMF has taken a back seat to some newer trends in BI, such as sophisticated dashboards, Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) support, graphical reports and more, which have become the standards by which BI tools are evaluated. IBM’s release of QMF Version 10, however, is a game-changer…

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