CICS / WebSphere

CICS has been continually developed and enhanced during its lifetime, and its problem determination data has also been extended and improved during that time. Facilities such as z/OS system dumps, internal and external tracing, exception trace data and built-in diagnostic trap mechanisms, together with a rich set of first failure data capture messages, journaling and SMF data, are all available to assist in problem determination, both at an application and at a system level…

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Most of us are faced with the same challenge on a daily basis: the need to succeed in today’s dynamic and increasingly competitive marketplace. If you’re a WebSphere Application Server (WAS) administrator, developer, architect or a manager and are looking to enhance the resiliency of WAS and add mobile and cloud access to your back-end systems without buying additional software tools, then this article is for you. Learn how you can improve the availability and scalability of your WAS applications on distributed and z/OS platforms by taking advantage of new distributed dynamic clustering, intelligent routing capabilities and health management…

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Since it was introduced in 1993 under the MQSeries name, IBM’s WebSphere MQ messaging integration middleware product has allowed systems and applications to be connected, regardless of the platform or environment. WebSphere MQ can, for example, allow a desktop application to communicate seamlessly with an IBM CICS transaction that’s running on the IBM z/OS operating system…

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How to access CICS transactions from a web browser has been the topic of numerous articles and training sessions. However, if you just want to get your feet wet in the CICS web swamp, where do you start? This is the bare bones story—the absolute minimum—to web-enable a web-unaware (i.e., an application that doesn’t understand HTTP or HTML) legacy CICS application using the CICS 3270 bridge. We won’t delve into explaining HTML, SOAP or any other protocol, as there are numerous resources available on those topics. Also, we won’t describe the many flavors of web access or CICS Web service commands…

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The article “New Technologies Help Bridge Gap Between Mobile and the Mainframe” (available at http://entsys.me/ekjfo) discussed how CICS helps bridge the gap between the mainframe and mobile devices. It also examined the IBM CICS Transaction Server (TS) Feature Pack, which introduces native support for JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) data in CICS. In this article, we go a step further and discuss just how easy it is to create mobile-enabled services from your existing CICS assets, and how these can be rapidly incorporated into an IBM Worklight project for deployment to a multitude of mobile devices…

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Previous articles (see the “References” section) discussed the tremendous benefits accrued from using the CICS Open Transaction Environment (OTE), ranging from improved multiprocessor exploitation to reductions in software license charges. In this final article, we take a closer look at the CPU savings seen in large CICS/DB2 applications after they’re converted to threadsafe, as well as the critical elements of a successful conversion, including:…

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The latest version of IBM CICS Transaction Gateway (CICS TG), Version 9.0, was made generally available in December 2012. CICS TG V9.0 builds on the strengths of previous versions by elimi-nating many of the restrictions and variations between different deployment topologies and provid-ing enhancements so CICS TG can be used in a wider variety of deployments and process larger workloads than ever before. Some of the trade-offs between the various deployment options have been eliminated, allowing CICS TG to be used in a configuration that best fits your needs and re-quirements…

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This third and final piece of the IBM CICS Version 5.1 puzzle addresses the performance and scalability enhancements and new capabilities introduced in this latest version. We’ll examine how you can run more work in a single CICS region and how you may be able to combine CICS regions to save additional CPU, and present some performance measurements and release-to-release changes. We’ll also examine new resource policies that allow you to put rules in place to prevent transactions, or groups of transactions, from exceeding predefined thresholds and actions you can take if transactions exceed that threshold. We’ll also examine some of the scalability tooling available to help you determine what your transactions are doing to help you set these parameters and policies correctly. …

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