Applications & Integrations

Continuous Delivery strategy (see Glossary) takes its origin in start-up companies. The benefits of adopting Continuous Delivery principles are clear and plentiful. Continuous Delivery improvements in productivity are achieved through increased software deployment frequency and delivering new features to production in small increments, thus reducing the risks of production failures. The way Continuous Delivery is adopted in start-ups is organic and straightforward due to the greenfield nature of the development processes and the focus on a specific product or service. Enterprises, however, are a different story (see Figure 1). Enterprises, which often emerge as a result of numerous mergers and acquisitions, have decades-long lifespans, established cultures, policies and processes, and utilize diverse sets of software and hardware. There are concerns about how quickly enterprises can adopt new software development philosophies and strategies [Ref. 3]. Clearly, enterprises would get tangible benefits from adopting a Continuous Delivery strategy as start-up companies do. It is just that the path to adopting disciplines such as Continuous Delivery in enterprise organizations is likely to be different, transformational…

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Rexx to Java

Users installing mainframe systems have long been familiar with ISPF and REXX systems. These systems are used to install applications written in traditional mainframe programming languages. Not only were load libraries and application-specific files created, these systems also performed configuration of the application. This could mean creating files and updating them with input provided by the user at install time. Efforts at mainframe modernization have added a new language to the mix, Java. Applications written in Java quite often have a properties file that contains configuration information. Users are accustomed to editing this file after the application has been installed; so, it follows that installing Java applications on the mainframe should be similar to, if not identical to, installing traditional applications…

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WebSphere MQ, formerly known as MQSeries and referred to simply as “MQ” in this article, is a message queuing software from IBM. Introduced in the mid-1990s, MQ has become the de facto standard for asynchronous application communication. MQ usually doesn’t cause excessive performance problems, but it can cause headaches if it’s not tuned…

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When strategizing Big Data, enterprises find themselves at the corner of a huge opportunity and the hurdles they need to jump over to turn opportunity into business growth. We’re still in the infancy of Big Data, but IT and line of business (LOB) leaders know that significant business value will accrue from efficiently managing and analyzing large, complex data sets…

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Enterprise Tech Journal recently had the pleasure of speaking with Kevin Goulet about overcoming the challenges inherent in managing Big Data on System z. As vice president of Product Management for the CA Technologies Database Management portfolio with a long history of product leadership roles, Kevin is in a prime position to observe the Big Data market and the issues companies face in establishing effective Big Data management solutions. Since a sizeable portion of the audience of Enterprise Tech Journal is DBAs who are often charged with the day-to-day handling of Big Data solutions, we focused our questions on issues that will help them be more effective in that role. Let’s see what this expert in the field had to say…

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“Any darn fool can make something complex; it takes a genius to make something simple.” This quote has been attributed to different people over the years, from Albert Einstein to Pete Seeger. Whatever its origin, it can really be applied to code. When given a task to accomplish, developers should all be able to code something that will work. But how will it be understood and maintained in the future? How can you objectively measure something as complex as complexity?…

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Static SQL is rigidly formed and usually provides a known access path to data. Dynamic SQL is more flexible, but this flexibility comes with some trade-offs. For example, dynamic SQL brings the potential for more accurate access paths but at the cost of not knowing what that access path will be before the SQL is run…

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