Latest Entries

For the past several years, open systems storage has dominated the storage industry, with companies focusing on networking their server-attached storage and consolidating storage into SANs. To this end, midrange storage has grabbed the spotlight, as vendors have rushed to introduce midrange products, such as IBM’s FastT and EMC’s CLARiiON systems, which introduce mainframe-like features and storage capacities at a significantly reduced cost. Some industry analysts even observed that other than cost, the distinctions between mainframe and midrange storage were blurring…

Read Full Article →

 Autonomic computing features on the zSeries are the culmination of a 40-year heritage that began with the introduction of MVS, and the ability to run mixed workloads on a single server. The S/390 of the ’90s first introduced Workload Manager (WLM) and Parallel Sysplex clustering; these technologies are the basis for many of the autonomic computing enhancements found in zSeries today…

Read Full Article →

With 2003 now in the books and 2004 beginning with encouraging signs of economic optimism, what does the New Year hold for the mainframe? For this I had to look no further than the wise prognostications of the soothsaying master himself: Dr. Linus Streetmeyer III, Wizard Emeritus of the Global United Mainframe Society (GUMS) based in Bubblegum, Switzerland.

Read Full Article →

Exploiting CMS & CP in z/Linux

As we’ve seen in previous articles, Linux on the mainframe is largely similar to Linux on a PC. However, the main thrust of this ongoing series has been to show how Linux guests in a z/VM environment can leverage VM’s capabilities to do things otherwise impossible on a stand-alone Intel server. In this article, we’ll examine the use of CMS as an extremely smart BIOS for the z/Linux guest and how to maximize CP services and the CMS file system from within Linux itself.

Read Full Article →

IT Asset Management: A No-Brainer Solution

Picture this: You’ve been happily married for 10 years. You have two delightful, young children, four fairly new vehicles in your garage, and you belong to three country clubs, even though you haven’t played golf in years. Your garage and spare bedroom are stuffed to the ceiling with hobbies you’ve lost interest in, though you are still paying the hefty insurance premium on your Persian rug collection. Life is good, except that you are spending 20 percent more every month than you are earning. Everyone is telling you it’s time you did something about it (notably your bank manager). So, what can you do about it?

Read Full Article →

Inside IBM

CICS TS 2.3

Version 2.3 (203-296) of CICS Transaction Server (TS) includes those Java virtual machine (JVM) improvements: a workload selection mechanism, shared class cache, continuous JVMs, dedicated storage monitor for JVMs, nesting of Java programs, more diagnostic trace granularity with CETR, status monitoring of JVMs in a pool with INQUIRE JVM, JVM profile management, and optimization of launcher code for methods. A new object request broker (ORB) supports Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) 2.3 and General Inter-ORB Protocol (GIOP) 1.2…

Read Full Article →

Understanding FICON Channel Path Metrics

While FICON channels offer significant advantages in terms of channel bandwidth and performance, many users long for the old steam gauge utilization metrics provided for ESCON channels. While there are no simple rules-of-thumb for FICON channel management, this article will explore the available path utilization metrics and suggest new metrics for FICON channels.

Read Full Article →

Picking the Best SQL Statement to Tune

You may have read the title and are now thinking to yourself that the best SQL statement to tune is the one the users are complaining about today. I would not argue with that perspective. However, I would like to present a different approach to SQL tuning. This discussion will not take the place of firefighting problem transactions, but it just might remove those situations from your routine. Proactive performance tuning has been discussed for years. This article examines a methodology that can be applied to any application for purposes of tuning the portions of the application that would provide the greatest return on that tuning investment. It is based on the Pareto principle, or the “80/20 Rule.” When applied to a DB2 application, this rule presumes that 80 percent of the resource usage (CPU, memory, and I/O) is being consumed by 20 percent of the SQL in that application. Therefore, tuning that 20 percent of the SQL statements would provide the greatest ROI…

Read Full Article →