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What, exactly, does “legacy integration” mean? Most old hands in IT would certainly agree that integrating a non-mainframe application with a mainframe application would qualify. Of course, our interpretation of legacy integration has evolved over the years. We now include the integration of almost any applications, as long as the architecture of one of the applications is significantly older. Any application that was not designed to support the distributed architecture du jour, let alone the many standards de facto and de jure, is now said to be a legacy application…

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Service-Oriented Architectures (SOAs) allow enterprises to share common application services and information. This sharing is accomplished either by defining application services that can be shared and therefore integrated, or by providing the infrastructure for such application service sharing. Application services can be shared by hosting them on a central server or by accessing them inter-application (e.g., through Web Services)…

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Acursory scan of the headlines in IT trade press publications this month presents a pretty grim picture. In numerous state governments, CIOs have resigned or been fired amidst claims of rampant IT mismanagement, while the Government Accounting Office reports that more than $2 billion in IT funding has been wasted at the Department of Defense…

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z/Data Perspectives: What Is Large?

Every now and then, some sage consultant will offer advice such as “Large DB2 tablespaces should be partitioned” or “Bind your DB2 applications using ACQUIRE (ALLOCATE) and RELEASE(DEALLOCATE) for high-volume transaction workloads.” But how useful is this advice? What is meant by large and high volume? Terms such as these are nebulous and ever changing. Just what is a large database today?…

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In 1878, a 19-year-old Polish student named L.L. Zamenhof introduced his attempt to bridge the language chasms created over the centuries with a language he called Esperanto. At this point in Zamenhof’s brief lifetime, Poland was a part of the Russian empire, and his town’s population was comprised of four major ethnic groups: Russians, Poles, Germans and a large group of Yiddish-speaking Jews. Zamenhof was described as saddened and frustrated by the many quarrels between these groups. He supposed that the main reason for the hate and prejudice lay in mutual misunderstanding, caused by the lack of one common language that would play the role of a neutral communication tool between people of different ethnic and linguistic backgrounds…

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Once upon a time, a 3390 Model 3, with 2.8GB of storage capacity (3,339 cylinders of 15 tracks of 849,960 bytes), was a rather large disk. That time has long since passed. However, most S/390 and zSeries installations continue to use the venerable Model 3 as their basic storage system. Most zSeries Linux systems, therefore, inherit the Model 3. At sites running z/VM, they’ll usually get minidisks carved out of this for their use rather than entire dedicated devices. Because the Linux DASD driver uses, by default, a 4K block size, the formatted capacity of a 3390-3, in a form useful to Linux, is generally about 2.3GB…

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Mainframe managers today are struggling to craft a cost-effective strategy for business continuance, of which traditional disaster recovery is only one part. The broader mandate of business continuance, however, makes it a more complicated and potentially more expensive task than mainframe disaster recovery. This is forcing managers to explore a growing set of options, especially asynchronous replication, and to assemble the optimum mix of technologies to achieve the organization’s business continuance and disaster recovery goals in the most cost-effective way…

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