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The mainframe has always been able to support complex storage environments and every type of application from mission-critical to archival applications. In contrast, non-mainframe systems (UNIX, Linux, and Windows) were designed for computation and not to perform intensive data and storage management tasks. No one knew then that these computing systems would one day be asked to do the work of a mainframe. As a result, average disk allocation levels for UNIX and Windows systems average only 30 to 45 percent of total drive capacity while mainframe disk storage averages about 80 percent allocation. Somehow, this low level of storage resource utilization continues to be tolerated by non-mainframe businesses and contributes heavily to storage inefficiency while adding cost…

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A previous article (z/Journal, April/May 2010) discussed an architectural arrangement for CICS Transaction Server (TS) 4.1 to act as a Web service provider for SOAP/XML requests. The Web service for execution in the CICS TS environment will be (relatively) short-lived and may be accessing data and logic that already exist in the CICS environment. The term “Web server” is used to mean something that processes a Web service request; it doesn’t mean a general-purpose item that can generally process many types of requests. Figure 1 shows the suggested arrangement…

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CICS and Web 2.0

Somebody once said that a technology isn’t mainstream until it has made it to CICS. This must mean that Web 2.0, introduced in CICS Transaction Server (TS) Version 3 (V3) and integrated into CICS TS V4, has finally made it to the enterprise level. With a collection of SupportPacs and core CICS technology, IBM is showing its commitment to Web 2.0 technology…

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z/OS Data De-De-De-De-duplication

The mind is a wonderful and powerful thing. When you read the title for this article, your mind identified duplicate strings in the data, parsed them out, and may have generated a chuckle interrupt. Clearly, there is an enormous quantity of duplicate sequential data in our enterprises and the maintenance of this data is a key driver for the hardware, energy, and facility costs of storage…

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Security in Migrating to Linux on IBM System z

Organizations that are in the process or considering migrating to Linux on System z look to a variety of sources for “best practice” guidelines.  One of the most popular is IBM’s “Practical Migration to Linux on System z” which is written by their International Technical Support Organization.  Commonly referred to as an IBM Redbook, this publication is a technical planning guide for organizations that are migrating to Linux on System z. “Within the context of a pre-existing UNIX-based or x86 environment, we present an end-to-end view of the technical challenges and methods necessary to complete a successful migration to Linux on System z,” is how the “Practical Migration to Linux on System z” describes it’s purpose.   

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The service levels of the past, although well-defined and monitored, were specified in terms of availability and response time. By the time the millennium arrived, computers had become so powerful that very few transactional systems presented workloads that were difficult to manage. Yes, there were exceptions, but the mainstream IT departments had ceased to pore over the “CPU accounts” and agonize over the cost of upgrading the mainframes. Moore’s Law had changed the landscape…

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Ever since Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) came on the scene, it’s been the subject of much discussion and anticipation. Organizations that understand it well know it isn’t just another new-fangled technology, but an evolutionary discipline of application architecture and design. But whether SOA was pursued with a sense of responsibility or just as a response to the hype, everyone hoped it would become the next “killer app.”…

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