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CICS Integrated Translator

There have been many customers confused about the Integrated Translator since it was introduced, in fact there may still be customers that are not even aware that it exists.  Many times, customers install a new release of CICS and since IBM has always said that applications don’t have to be re-compiled or even re-linked for the new release, they don’t bother to change any of their compile PROCs (procedures).  Of course, if the existing CICS libraries (SDFH**** libraries) contain a version number or reference, those PROCs must be changed to the new library name.  Many installations support these compile PROCs in a PROCLIB that is available to all developers, so their JCL does not change and the system support staff will change the internal content of the members.  Needless to say, most of the time the developers are used to a ‘standard’ CICS compile PROC and merely change their source input and target link library for the output…

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When CICSPlex SM was released in the early ’90s, it was widely regarded by the CICS community as a complex beast to install and operate. At its inception, it was released as a chargeable product separate from CICS. To encourage users to try it, IBM (in the U.K., at least) provided a couple of days of free consulting support with the system. This was to assist users in getting it up and running and to provide some guidance on its use! To get the whole system to run well, some significant tuning and configuration were required. That necessitated a degree of expertise that wasn’t widely available in those early days. 

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A great deal of attention is being focused on the power consumption of IT systems. For example, statistics published by the European Commission Bio Intelligence Service in 2008 found that IT systems accounted for 8 percent of the total electricity usage in the EU in 2005, which is equivalent to 98 megatons of carbon dioxide (CO2). The report went on to predict that this figure would rise to more than 10 percent of total consumption in due course, and put forward some very ambitious targets for reduction. Similar statistics are being gathered and publicized throughout the world…

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The WAVV requirements project has significantly enhanced the WAVV requirements process for 2010. Effective immediately, requirements processed during WAVV will be posted to the WAVV Website (www.wavv.org) for the z/VSE, z/VM, and Linux community to review and vote on. Please carefully follow the voting directions listed on this Website. Any discussions should be carried out via the z/VSE, z/VM, and Linux Web discussion list…

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When it comes to mainframe computing, business IT planners and practitioners alike confront a significant challenge that will require an industrywide effort to rectify. These planners have an affirmative view of the mainframe. They agree that it persists as a core platform for corporate computing. Its performance characteristics and cost of ownership advantages over alternative platforms are understood and appreciated. From the standpoint of cost, compliance, continuity and carbon footprint (utility power consumption), the business value case for the mainframe is rock solid and is even underscored by both current economic realities and the prevailing regulatory climate. …

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I’m just back from WAVV, and a grand time was had by all. More than 150 customers, vendors, and IBMers spent four days in Covington, KY (just outside Cincinnati), talking about z/VM, z/VSE, and Linux on System z. Although WAVV may not hold its conventions in the hot spots of the convention universe, it’s an all-volunteer organization that delivers a great bargain for System z education. You can also use it as a vehicle to tell IBM—and other vendors—what features and functions you’d like to see in upgrades and future products. WAVV has a very slick requirements process; to learn more, visit www.wavv.org. (Be sure to see Pete Clark’s column in this issue, as he discusses some recent changes to the requirements process.) …

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