Latest Entries

CICS has been continually developed and enhanced during its lifetime, and its problem determination data has also been extended and improved during that time. Facilities such as z/OS system dumps, internal and external tracing, exception trace data and built-in diagnostic trap mechanisms, together with a rich set of first failure data capture messages, journaling and SMF data, are all available to assist in problem determination, both at an application and at a system level…

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IBM announced that the U.S. Department of Energy has awarded IBM contracts valued at $325 million to develop and deliver the world’s most advanced “data centric” supercomputing systems at Lawrence Livermore and Oak Ridge National Laboratories to advance innovation and discovery in science, engineering and national security. IBM’s new systems using a “data centric” approach puts computing power everywhere data resides, minimizing data in motion and energy consumption…

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John Marzluff is an ornithologist and a professor of Wildlife Science at the University of Washington. In his new book, Subirdia, he discusses his study of what happens to the suburban bird population as their landscape changes underneath them—for instance when a wooded area is cleared for new housing, shopping or golf courses…

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In the August/September 2014 issue of Enterprise Tech Journal, we provided an introduction to one of the most important components of z/OS—the System Management Facilities (SMF) component. Two of the key parts of MVS that write records to SMF are the job scheduling system and the master scheduler. SMF records are written as address spaces are created, executed and terminated. In this article, we’ll describe the life of an address space and when user exits are called and SMF records are written. Future articles will include more detail on SMF parameters, recommendations on SMF file creation and usage, and details about the most important record types…

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Over the past several years, autonomic statistics has been a much-discussed feature of DB2 10 and 11. The vast majority of customers we talk with are very excited about this feature because it solves the often-asked question: Why can’t DB2 be smart enough to automatically execute RUNSTATS when required? However, after revisiting with some of these customers, we were surprised to learn that once the excitement died down, none had implemented autonomic statistics. Most of the feedback pointed to the implementation being confusing and cumbersome…

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