Latest Entries

Unless you’ve been sheltering yourself from the media, by now you’ve probably heard or read about “The Internet of Things,” or IoT. IoT is a bunch of “things,” also known as endpoint devices, that are connected to your network. IoT includes your servers, computers, mobile devices and any other device that connects to your network at any time. Just as there are now smartphones, there will soon be more “smart” devices that talk to other smart devices such as smart printers that let you know they’re running low on ink and send messages to other printers to print your job because the one you tried to print from is out of order. These devices will have operating systems behind them, such as Mac, Windows, Linux and others, and will have software that will need to be patched or updated. In a perfect world, these smart devices simplify our lives and automate tasks for us. However, there could be a big downfall to all this interconnectivity. All of these things that are connected to your network create new, two-way roads for attackers to travel. If they can attack your things, which connect to your corporate network, they can attack your network. And if they can attack your network, they can attack the things connected to it: computers, other devices, equipment and appliances…

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Last year, I wrote a column for Enterprise Executive that introduced software-defined networking (SDN) to readers. SDN is a relatively new approach to computer networking, which evolved from some preliminary research and work done at UC Berkeley and Stanford University in 2005. SDN proposes to disaggregate traditionally vertically integrated networking stacks to improve network feature velocity and customize network operation for specialized environments. At the same time, this disaggregation will improve network flexibility and manageability. SDN enables “mass customization” of network operations to better support differentiated cloud services. SDN is comprised of a group of technologies that open the data, control and management planes of the network to participate more easily in broader orchestration frameworks through application programming interfaces (APIs). …

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Sometimes a little reverse psychology is necessary to effect a positive outcome. In this case, we show you the best ways to tune your applications by showing you how not to tune them. Consider it a worst practices list. If you don’t care about wasting money on poorly tuned applications, or you’re running your z/OS system for charity, you needn’t bother reading any further.  …

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